An Interview with Finch CEO, Mark Smith - "Straight to the Gut - How One Microbiologist is Leading the Way Toward Eradicating a Terrible Disease"

“Smith, who has a PhD in microbiology, has devoted much of his adult life to treating and curing C. diff, partly by founding two companies—OpenBiome and Finch Laboratories. The former is basically a non-profit “stool bank” that collects life-giving samples from donors, and the latter is a research and development company working on making the treatment available to all who need it—including in pill form.”

Finch Featured in GEN Article About Companies Advancing the Microbiome Field

When Smith launched OpenBiome, the entire landscape of CDI treatment changed. Now that he is at Finch Therapeutics, Smith is ready to change the treatment landscapes of many more diseases. “If we could manage this ecosystem and intentionally modulate the composition of this community,” he declares, “we could radically impact the drivers of morbidity and mortality.”

The Economist - "More Evidence that Autism is Linked to Gut Bacteria"

‘Meanwhile, the success of the study in Arizona has prompted America’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to look into the matter. A firm called Finch Therapeutics Group, based in Massachusetts, hopes to commercialise the use of MTT as a treatment for autism and the FDA has now granted this effort “fast track” status, which should speed up the review process.’

Finch featured in New York Times article on FMT and drug development

“Over the past decade, tens of thousands of Americans with C. diff have been cured through fecal transplants, often with a single dose that can bring patients back from the brink of death. The treatment has more than an 80 percent success rate, according to several studies, and many patients feel better within hours of receiving the procedure, which is usually administered through colonoscopy or capsules containing desiccated fecal matter.”

Leveraging Finch’s machine learning expertise in C. diff. and beyond

CEO Mark Smith describes the vast potential of the microbiome and Finch’s therapeutic platforms:

“We think the microbiome is really fundamental to many aspects of who we are, how our immune systems function, how we regulate our metabolism and how we think and feel,’ says Smith, who predicts ‘broad potential across a number of therapeutic areas.”

Microbiotal reverse-engineering: How Finch is moving from fecal microbiota transplant to oral therapy

Microbiotal reverse-engineering: How Finch is moving from fecal microbiota transplant to oral therapy

Finch Therapeutics Inc. is developing an oral alternative to fecal microbial transplant that it believes entails less biology risk than more advanced oral candidates, with more targeted delivery than full microbiome transplants delivered via enema.

Takeda to Develop Finch's Microbiome Therapeutic for IBD

Takeda to Develop Finch's Microbiome Therapeutic for IBD

Takeda is paying Finch Therapeutics $10 million upfront for exclusive, global rights to develop and commercialize the latter’s inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) candidate, FIN-524, together with rights to follow-on products for IBD indications.

Takeda partners with an upstart drugs-from-bugs microbiome player inspired by a fecal transplantation biz

Takeda partners with an upstart drugs-from-bugs microbiome player inspired by a fecal transplantation biz

Back when Mark Smith was working on his PhD at MIT about 6 years ago, his girlfriend’s cousin was infected with C.diff. After 7 reoccurrences following treatment with vancomycin, though, the cousin finally beat it by getting a fecal transplant, with his roommate as the donor.